Harris and others have applied this argument to large sample of societies

Harris and others have applied this argument to large sample of societies

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Harris and others have applied this argument to large sample of societies (correlating warfare with male-biased sex ratios), but have focused particularly on well-studied case of Yanomamo Indians of NE Amazonia •intensive warfare (ca. 30% adult male mortality) •highly skewed child sex ratio (0-4 yrs) of 148:100 in areas with greatest warfare (periphery = 118:100); evens out by age 50 due to male war deaths •high rate of polygyny (some men have 4-5 wives; 25% have at least 2) •female infanticide + polygyny intense competition for wives •most warfare related to this competition Harris' explanation has been severely criticized on two grounds: 1) empirical critiques: sufficiency of animal protein, population dynamics, infanticide
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Unformatted text preview: 2) theoretical critique: logic of population regulation On protein issue, Chagnon & other Yanomamo spets refute scarcity: • animal protein averages 65gm/adult standard/day (NRC recommends 40 gm for Yanomamo body size) • warfare more frequent between villages that don't share boundaries • village with lower (33 gm) animal protein intake had same frequency of warfare as village with higher (77 gm) intake Harris & colleagues have responded by saying high protein intake is sign of how effective warfare is (less warlike tribes have less protein), which seems like an ad-hoc argument meant to make the hypothesis unfalsifiable More serious criticism is lack of evidence of population regulation among Yanomamo, who at time of Chagnon's main study had high rate of population growth (ca. 3% per annum)...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course ANT ANT2000 taught by Professor Monicaoyola during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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