Japanese Immigration

Japanese Immigration - Study Guide for Takaki A Different...

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Study Guide for Takaki, A Different Mirror, Ch. 10 "Pacific Crossings" (Japanese immigrants). World Systems Theory (Immanuel Wallerstein) and Asian Migration
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World Systems theory: Themes: 1.Europe and US expanded into Third World to appropriate resources and labor . Prosperity of home country depend on exploitation of colonies. Colonial powers—Spanish, Great Britain, Dutch and French—entered into periphery—Africa and Middle East —and then into Asia. 1,In 1565, Spanish took over the Philippines. 2,In the early 1800s, Great Britain conquered India 3,Then Great Britain defeated China in the Opium Wars (1838-1842). It imposed “extraterritoriality” via Treaty of Nanjing.” (1843)(this treaty first opened 5 then 12 ports under English Law). Under “extraterritoriality” English law would be enforced in there areas, not Chinese law which was very humiliating to the Chinese.
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World Systems theory: Themes (2): 4,U.S. signed a similar treaty with China soon after. 5,French and Dutch pushed into Indo-China. 2.European Presence disrupted local communities and created conditions to emigrate out of countries . 1,Colonies were forced to import goods, disrupting local economies and in China central government raises taxes to pay $21 million in indemnities . 2,Emergence of coolie trade: Indians and Chinese were sent to Peru, Cuba and Sandwich Islands (Hawaii). 3,However, Chinese immigrants came to HA and mainland via credit ticket system.
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World Systems theory: Themes (3): 3.Emigration to colony or colonial headquarters provided opportunities : 1, Higher wage, higher standard of living. 4.Migration = a function of the world system: 1,Unequal relations between colonies and colonial headquarters forced people in the former territories to migrate to the latter . 2,However, push-pull theory assumes all conditions are equal and that there are no differences in power relations. It assumes immigrants voluntarily migrate from an area of labor surplus to one of shortage and where wages are higher. 3,However, Networks --family and village ties—provided resources and are expanded through migration.
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Q#1. What factors forced Japanese to emigrate from Japan? What attracted them to Hawaii? Case of Japan: A.Origins : 1. Tokugawa period (1600-1868) to the Meiji Restoration : 1, When military rulers called Shogun controlled lesser feudal lords via hostage system. 2, Until the end of the 19th Century, Japan was effectively closed off from the West. 3,Only outsider permitted into Japan were Chinese merchants in Nagasaki and Ryukyu Islands (Okinawa) and a handful of Koreans on Tsushima Islands and Dutch on Deshima. 4,However, before the Tokugawa era, the Portuguese had
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Japanese Immigration - Study Guide for Takaki A Different...

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