Mexican Immigration

Mexican Immigration - Study Guide for Takaki, A Different...

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Study Guide for Takaki, A Different Mirror, Ch. 12 “El Norte: The Borderland of Chicano America” (Mexican Immigration and Mexican Immigrants and Mexican Americans of Texas and CA)
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I. Origins: Q#1. Describe the push-pull factors determining Mexican Immigration to the U.S. How was the status of Mexican immigrants different from that of Japanese immigrants. What previous migration experiences did Mexican immigrants have?
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A.Colonial Context Contributed to Mexican Migration : 1. Trade relations vis-à-vis the US : US Export manufacutred goods to Mexico while importing primary goods from Mexico. By 1900 although Mexico underwent economic growth under the Dictator Porfirio Diaz (1876-1910), Mexico was still an “underdeveloped nation. “By 1911, Mexico” according to one historian, “was truly an economic satellite of the US.” 2.Moreover, American corporation sought investments in Mexico to exploit its resources and cheap labor . For example: El Paso , Texas was part of regional economy of the cattle industry in North Mexico. National organizations such as Swift, Armor and Morris built meat packing facilities in El Paso and imported cattle from Juarez. El Paso was in turn a satellite of Northern East US, providing meat and mineral resources to it and buying finished manufactured goods from there.
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El Paso 1883
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A.Colonial Context Contributed to Mexican Migration (2) 3.Under Diaz, haciendas and American land companies took over “public lands,” previously owned by campesinos/ peasants . 1,Diaz regime opened Mexico to US business interests which took over much of peasants' land. Eventually leading to revolution 1910-. 2,In 1883, Diaz enacted a land law to attract US and foreign investment to stimulate exports such as cotton and coffee, allowing companies to keep 1/3 of land surveyed. 3,By the 1890s 1/5 of Mexico’s land transferred to haciendas or foreign land companies, mostly American. According to one scholar, from 1876 to 1910, 5 Million peasants were displaced. 4.The Uprooted families migrate to cities. Next step was for them to migrate to US . 5.Civil war continued during 1910-20s forcing many to flee Mexico . (312, 314)
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B. Mexican Immigrant Status: Unlike Japanese and Chinese immigrants, Mexicans were Eligible for American citizenship under Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo . 1.Mexicans were able to cross border without passports . 2.However, the border at Imperial valley was qyuite porous before World War II so many Japanese and Chinese crossed borders without passports. In the 1930s about ¼ of Japanese in Imperial Valley had no papers according to the Japanese Consulate). (312) 3.Mexican part of Third Wave of migration within US Colonial sphere after 1924: Filipino, Puerto Rican, African American. C.Pull of high wages to US
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course HIST 121 taught by Professor - during the Spring '10 term at Diablo Valley College.

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Mexican Immigration - Study Guide for Takaki, A Different...

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