No More Peck O Corn (Takaki Ch. 5)

No More Peck O Corn (Takaki Ch. 5) - Diablo Valley College...

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Unformatted text preview: Diablo Valley College History 121 Dr. Kent Haldan Takaki, Chapter 5 No More Peck OCorn: Slavery and Its Discontents African Americans in the North Q#1 .Describe the population and status of African Americans in the North. What were some of the discriminatory laws and practices towards them? Describe the impact of these policies and practices against northern blacks. Describe the work of Samuel Morton on the cranial capacities of whites and blacks. A. 225,000 African Americans in North. 1% of pop. Lowest segment of caste society. B. Social : 1.African Americans faced Segregation in education , transportation facilities, churches, theaters and places of entertainment, as de Tocqueville noted in the 1830s. (In Philadelphia African Americans had to sit in front of street cars; NY had separate buses). 2.African Americans Trapped in ghettos. C.Political context : 1,African Americans had Limited suffrage rights: NY 1821 Blacks had to own property to vote, while whites could qualify in other ways: pay taxes, militia service. In 1838, Penn. Legislature established universal white suffrage while disenfranchising blacks completely. 2,Mob violence (Philadelphia in 1834 and Cincinnati in 1841). White workers, fearing competition from them, attacked blacks. 3,Meanwhile, Democratic Party success pre-Civil War depended upon coalition of working class northerners and Southern planters. This alliance was mirrored in the popular cultureblack minstrelsy in the North. However, the Whigs tended to attract middle class, Protestant following and had a strong abolitionist wing, like Theodore Parker who later supported John Brown efforts. D.Cultural : Negative Images ( Ethnic Notions Video). 1.Note the Popularity of black minstrel showsthe first National American popular culture--throughout the North: Its symbols: the Sambo (Justify slavery as protective of child-like blacks), Zip Coon (Argues the inability of Blacks to assimilate in the North). 2.Black face minstrelsy replaced/displaced legitimate black entertainers who had been part of public events and local popular culture. 3.Most minstrels were Irish who were emphasizing their whiteness to become American. Irish played a crucial role in the labor movement and politics to make American=whiteness. In the early 1830s Thomas Daddy Rice Saw a Crimple Black man dancing and imitated him, creating the Sambo character. Thomas Daddy Rices Dance was called Jim Crow which became the name of the system of segregation in the South after the Civil War. 4.History of Blackface Minstrelsy Three men, Thomas Rice, Dan Emmet and EP Christy are recognized as the founders of blackface. And Stephen Foster was the major white innovator of minstrel music....
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No More Peck O Corn (Takaki Ch. 5) - Diablo Valley College...

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