The Progressive Era (Henretta Ch. 20)

The Progressive Era (Henretta Ch. 20) - Diablo Valley...

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Diablo Valley College History 121 Dr. Kent Haldan The Progressive Era, 1900- 1914 (Henretta, Chapter 20)
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Richard Oakley Q#1. How did Richard Oakley view the Pullman Strike of 1894 and what legislation was enacted? What is it’s significance? Richard Oakley, who had broken the Pullman Strike of 1894, felt that the federal government should regulate labor relations in the railroad industry to prevent paralyzing strikes.
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Richard Oakley: Fed need to regulate labor relations: B.in 1898, Congress enacted the Erdman Railway Mediation Act to begin this process. C.The Crisis of the 1890s forced the Nation’s leaders to consider reform Absorbed in the great process of becoming the world’s most industrialized advance country in the world, leaders now confronted: 1.Concentration of corporate power; 2. rebellious working class; 3.poverty in cities, and 4.corrupt urban political machines.
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D. The Shift to Reform: Henretta: It was as if social reform had reached a critical mass around 1900 and set reform activity as a major self- sustaining phenomenon.” (612) The years from 1900 to 1915 have come to be known as the Progressive Era.
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Jane Addams Q#2. What settlement work did she perform in Chicago. What was her background. How does Jane Addams embody the middle-class reform impulse? What is the Social Gospel?
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Jane Addams (1860-1934)
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A. Jane Addams In 1888 Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr founded Hull House in a run-down neighborhood full of salons and Italian immigrants on Chicago’s West side. This dilapidated building became the model for settlement house springing up in ghettoes around the country.
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Hull House
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Inside Hull House
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Jane Addams’ work in Chicago: According to Henretta et al. “The settlement house was the hallmark of social progressivism, and for Jane Addams it meant a lifetime in ugly surroundings, endlessly battling for garbage removal, play gounds, better street lights and police protection.”
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Jane Addams’ work in Chicago: The Hull House, an organization internationally renowned for being a "Cathedral of Compassion." Activities included the Hull House Public Kitchen which provided food for working women who had previously always depended on canned goods and candy to feed their families, and the "Jane Club," a co-operative boarding club for girls who had to work
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B. Jane Addams’ background 1.She was born into the middle class and could have lived an easy life in Illinois where her father was a state legislator. 2.She attended and graduated from Rockford College in 1882. 3.But she felt unfulfilled: “simply smothered and sickened by advantages.”
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Jane Addams’ background Hull House was her salvation allowing her to “begin with however small a group to accomplish and to live. C. She was experiencing a crisis that her
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course HIST 121 taught by Professor - during the Spring '10 term at Diablo Valley College.

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The Progressive Era (Henretta Ch. 20) - Diablo Valley...

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