Washington v.Du Bois

Washington v.Du Bois - Diablo Valley College History 120...

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Diablo Valley College History 120 Dr. Kent Haldan Washington v.Du Bois
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African American leadership: 1. By the late 1870s, the nation's concept of a leading colored man was one who had been elected to a high political office, such as PBS Pinchback who had been lieutenant governor of Louisiana or John Rainey who had been congressman from Alabama. These men were, however, out of touch with the AA community and when the Democrats took over the state governments during the 1870s-1880s, these men lost their elective position. Nor was Frederick Douglass who married a Euro- American woman and advocated AA assimilation in touch with the AA masses.
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African American leadership: 2. By the 1890s, the leadership of Black communities in the South began to emphasize self-help strategies. Black churches and newspapers encouraged blacks to patronize Black businesses: to advance along economic rather than political lines and to focus on the black community rather than the dominant white society.
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The arrival of B.T. Washington 3. With the arrival of B.T. Washington, Self-help took a new turn. In 1900 BTW began writing his autobiography, Up From Slavery which was published the following year. He was assisted by Max Thrasher, a white, former school teacher. He took a very "accommodating“ attitude toward the white south. He argued that AA s had not been ready for Reconstruction. He minimized the extent of race prejudice, accepted segregation, separate but equal, and downplayed political action. He favored property and educational qualification for franchisement for both Blacks and Whites (as did Du Bois).
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The arrival of B.T. Washington
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The arrival of B.T. Washington
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Theme of black responsibility. He suggested that Blacks were responsible for their unfortunate conditions and advised them to be thrifty and develop Christian characters. Examine ch. 1-3 for useful quotes to cite.
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Atlanta Address/Compromise: In his most famous speech--the Atlanta Address/Compromise -- Washington spoke for the African American communities of the South, which were shifting their focus from political to economic activities . Southern Blacks were concerned with land ownership, education, and self-help. But Washington encouraged Blacks to accommodate to social segregation.
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Atlanta Address/Compromise: He urged Blacks to stay in the South (in contrast, Ida B Wells urged them to go North or if they stayed in the South to boycott segregated facilities). Washington also felt that if Blacks became associated with wealth in the minds of whites, Blacks would eventually be granted their constitutional rights.
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4. Washington spoke to three audiences in Up From Slavery : former slaves, former slaveholders (esp. p. 34) and Northern activists. His constant name-dropping is one
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course HIST 121 taught by Professor - during the Spring '10 term at Diablo Valley College.

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Washington v.Du Bois - Diablo Valley College History 120...

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