Depth perception

Depth perception - Depth perception Because light is...

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Depth perception Because light is refracted at interfaces, objects you see across an interface appear to be shifted relative to where they really are. If you look straight down at an object at the bottom of a glass of water, for example, it looks closer to you than it really is. Looking perpendicular to an interface, the apparent depth is related to the actual depth by: An example A beam of light travels from water into a piece of diamond in the shape of a triangle, as shown in the diagram. Step-by-step, follow the beam until it emerges from the piece of diamond. (a) How fast is the light traveling inside the piece of diamond? The speed can be calculated from the index of refraction: (b) What is , the angle between the normal and the beam of light inside the diamond at the water-diamond interface? A diagram helps for this. In fact, let's look at the complete diagram of the whole path, and use this for the rest of the questions.
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The angle we need can be found from Snell's law: (c) The beam travels up to the air-diamond interface. What is
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Depth perception - Depth perception Because light is...

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