Faraday - Faraday's law of induction We'll move from the...

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Faraday's law of induction We'll move from the qualitative investigation of induced emf to the quantitative picture. As we have learned, an emf can be induced in a coil if the magnetic flux through the coil is changed. It also makes a difference how fast the change is; a quick change induces more emf than a gradual change. This is summarized in Faraday's law of induction. The induced emf in a coil of N loops produced by a change in flux in a certain time interval is given by: Recalling that the flux through a loop of area A is given by Faraday's law can be written: The negative sign in Faraday's law comes from the fact that the emf induced in the coil acts to oppose any change in the magnetic flux. This is summarized in Lenz's law. Lenz's law: The induced emf generates a current that sets up a magnetic field which acts to oppose the change in magnetic flux. Another way of stating Lenz's law is to say that coils and loops like to maintain the status quo (i.e., they don't like change). If a coil has zero magnetic flux, when a
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Faraday - Faraday's law of induction We'll move from the...

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