Ohm - Ohm's Law In many materials, the voltage and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ohm's Law In many materials, the voltage and resistance are connected by Ohm's Law: Ohm's Law : V = IR The connection between voltage and resistance can be more complicated in some materials.These materials are called non-ohmic. We'll focus mainly on ohmic materials for now, those obeying Ohm's Law. Example A copper wire has a length of 160 m and a diameter of 1.00 mm. If the wire is connected to a 1.5-volt battery, how much current flows through the wire? The current can be found from Ohm's Law, V = IR. The V is the battery voltage, so if R can be determined then the current can be calculated. The first step, then, is to find the resistance of the wire: L is the length, 1.60 m. The resistivity can be found from the table on page 535 in the textbook. The area is the cross-sectional area of the wire. This can be calculated using: The resistance of the wire is then: The current can now be found from Ohm's Law: I = V / R = 1.5 / 3.5 = 0.428 A Electric power Power is the rate at which work is done. It has units of Watts. 1 W = 1 J/s
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Ohm - Ohm's Law In many materials, the voltage and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online