The Compton effect

The Compton effect - particles. Light exhibits...

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The Compton effect Although photons have no mass, they do have momentum, given by: Convincing evidence for the fact that photons have momentum can be seen when a photon collides with a stationary electron. Some of the energy and momentum is transferred to the electron (this is known as the Compton effect), but both energy and momentum are conserved in such a collision. Applying the principles of conservation of energy and momentum to this collision, one can show that the wavelength of the outgoing photon is related to the wavelength of the incident photon by the equation: Wave-particle duality To explain some aspects of light behavior, such as interference and diffraction, you treat it as a wave, and to explain other aspects you treat light as being made up of
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Unformatted text preview: particles. Light exhibits wave-particle duality, because it exhibits properties of both waves and particles. Wave-particle duality is not confined to light, however. Everything exhibits wave-particle duality, everything from electrons to baseballs. The behavior of relatively large objects, like baseballs, is dominated by their particle nature; to explain the behavior of very small things like electrons, both the wave properties and particle properties have to be considered. Electrons, for example, exhibit the same kind of interference pattern as light does when they're incident on a double slit....
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