The force on a charged particle in a magnetic field

The force on a charged particle in a magnetic field - The...

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The force on a charged particle in a magnetic field An electric field E exerts a force on a charge q. A magnetic field B will also exert a force on a charge q, but only if the charge is moving (and not moving in a direction parallel to the field). The direction of the force exerted by a magnetic field on a moving charge is perpendicular to the field, and perpendicular to the velocity (i.e., perpendicular to the direction the charge is moving). The equation that gives the force on a charge moving at a velocity v in a magnetic field B is: This is a vector equation : F is a vector, v is a vector, and B is a vector. The only thing that is not a vector is q. Note that when v and B are parallel (or at 180°) to each other, the force is zero. The maximum force, F = qvB, occurs when v and B are perpendicular to each other. The direction of the force, which is perpendicular to both v and B, can be found using your right hand, applying something known as the right-hand rule. One way to do the right-hand rule is to do this: point all four fingers on your right hand in the direction
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The force on a charged particle in a magnetic field - The...

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