The Law of Conservation of Charge

The Law of Conservation of Charge - The Law of Conservation...

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The Law of Conservation of Charge The Law of conservation of charge states that the net charge of an isolated system remains constant. If a system starts out with an equal number of positive and negative charges, there¹s nothing we can do to create an excess of one kind of charge in that system unless we bring in charge from outside the system (or remove some charge from the system). Likewise, if something starts out with a certain net charge, say +100 e, it will always have +100 e unless it is allowed to interact with something external to it. Charge can be created and destroyed, but only in positive-negative pairs. Table of elementary particle masses and charges: Electrostatic charging Forces between two electrically-charged objects can be extremely large. Most things are electrically neutral; they have equal amounts of positive and negative charge. If this wasn¹t the case, the world we live in would be a much stranger place. We also have a lot of control over how things get charged. This is because we can choose the
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The Law of Conservation of Charge - The Law of Conservation...

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