Units of measure

Units of measure - is the distance between the Earth and...

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Units of measure For the most part, metric units are used in astronomy. Here's a quick re-cap of some of the common ones you'll run into - Mass kilograms - kg grams - gm Distance/Length meters - m kilometers - km centimeters - cm millimeters - mm Ångstroms - Å The trickiest thing is trying to remember what each of these things are in case you have to convert from one unit to another. Here is a listing if you need to convert from one value to another. 1 kg = 1000 gm 1 gm = 0.001 kg 1 meter = 100 cm = 1000 mm = 0.001 km = 10 10 Å 1 cm = 10 mm = 0.00001 km (10 -5 km) = 0.01 m = 10 8 Å 1 mm = 0.000001 km (10 -6 km) = 0.001 m = 0.1 cm = 10 7 Å 1 km = 1000 m = 100,000 cm = 1,000,000 mm = 10 13 Å 1 Å = 10 -10 m = 10 -8 cm = 10 -7 mm = 10 -13 km There are also some non-metric distances that are set up just for convenience. For example, there
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Unformatted text preview: is the distance between the Earth and the Sun, which is defined as 1 A. U. ( Astronomical Unit ). This is useful for measuring distances within the solar system. There is also the distance of a light-year- the distance light travels in one year. Parsec is another distance which is often used interchangeably with light-year. These are often used to indicate the distances between stars. For even greater distances there are kiloparsecs and kilo light-years (1 kiloparsec = 1000 parsecs, 1 kilo light-year = 1000 light-years) and for very great distances there is the mega parsec (a million parsecs) and mega light-years (a million light-years). The actual values for these distances and other common units of measure can be found in the table of constants ....
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