Bone Repair - Bone Repair Bone Repair Process Fracturing a...

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Bone Repair Bone Repair Process Fracturing a bone causes internal damage to the canaliculi vessels, nutrient and periosteal arteries. This causes bleeding within the periosteum called a haematoma. The haematoma is a solidified blood clot rather than a vascular free flowing swelling. Within the clot macrophages invade and remove avascular debris and dead bone around the site of the fracture. Once the site of the fracture is clear, granulation tissue (a formation of small capillaries and arterioles anchored onto a fine basement membrane) form within the haematoma. Osteogenic cells then proliferate from the periosteum and move closer towards the site of the fracture. Here the Osteogenic cells differentiate into chondrocytes, which lay down islands of cartilage. Osteogenic cells distal to the fracture site differentiate into osteoblasts and produce woven bone called a callus. The callus is detectable on X-ray as a distinct irregular swelling. Cartilaginous components of the callus are gradually replaced by bone through
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Bone Repair - Bone Repair Bone Repair Process Fracturing a...

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