Connective Tissue Found everywhere in the body

Connective Tissue Found everywhere in the body - Connective...

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Connective Tissue Found everywhere in the body. The most abundant and widely distributed of the primary tissues, but the amount in any particular organ varies. The skin consists primarily of connective tissue, while the brain contains very little. Connective tissue has many forms and functions. Its chief subclasses are: connective tissue proper, cartilage, bone, blood Its major fimctions include: binding and support, protection, insulation, and transportation Common Characteristics of Connective Tissue: Connective tissues have certain properties in common that set them apart from other primary tissues. 1. Common Origin: arises from mesenchyme - embryonic tissue derived from the mesoderm layer. 2. Degrees of Vascularity: runs the entire gamut of vascularity. Cartilage is avascular. Dense connective tissue is poorly vascularized. The other types have a rich supply of blood vessels. 3. Extracellular Matrix: connective tissues are composed largely of nonliving extracellular matrix, which separates the living cells of the tissue. Because of the matrix, connective tissue is
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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