Exocytosis moves substances out of the cell Substances to be released are enclosed within a membrane

Exocytosis moves substances out of the cell Substances to be released are enclosed within a membrane

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Exocytosis moves substances out of the cell Substances to be released are enclosed within a membrane sac which migrates to the plasma membrane, fuses, and then ruptures releasing the contents of the sac. Endocytosis is a means for allowing large particles or macromolecules to enter the cell. Substances to be taken in are progressively enclosed by a portion of the cell membrane. Once formed, the sac pinches off and moves into the cytoplasm where the contents are digested. There are two types of endocytosis: phagocytosis (when the substance to be ingested is a large particle) and pinocytosis (when the substances to be ingested are dissolved in water). Interaction with other Cells: Glycoproteins of the cell membrane serve as highly specific cell surface markers. They aid in cellular recognition and cell interaction: blood group antigens, binding sites for certain toxins (cholera, tetanus), recognition of the egg by sperm, determining cellular life span, immune response, embryonic development Cytoplasm - Cellular material inside the plasma membrane and outside the nucleus. It is the site
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Exocytosis moves substances out of the cell Substances to be released are enclosed within a membrane

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