Ovary Ligaments - Ovary Ligaments Each ovary is attached to several ligaments that help to hold it in position The largest of these formed by a

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Ovary Ligaments Each ovary is attached to several ligaments that help to hold it in position. The largest of these, formed by a fold of peritoneum, is called the "broad ligament." It is also attached to the uterine tubes and to the uterus. At its upper end, the ovary is held by a small fold of peritoneum, called the "suspensory ligament," which contains the ovarian blood vessels and nerves. At its lower end, it is attached to the uterus by a rounded, cord-like thickening of the broad ligament, called the "ovarian ligament." The "peritoneum" is a two-layered membrane that supports the abdominal organs, produces lubricating fluid that allows the organs to flow smoothly over each other, and protects against infection. Ovaries The ovaries are a pair of oval or almond-shaped glands which lie on either side of the uterus and just below the opening to the fallopian tubes. In addition to producing eggs or "ova," the ovaries produce female sex hormones called estrogen and progesterone. The ovaries produce a female hormone, called estrogen, and store female sex cells or "ova." The female, unlike the male, does not manufacture the sex cells. A girl baby is born with about 60,000 of these cells, which are
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Ovary Ligaments - Ovary Ligaments Each ovary is attached to several ligaments that help to hold it in position The largest of these formed by a

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