The Medial Umbilical Ligament

The Medial Umbilical Ligament - The Medial Umbilical...

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: The Medial Umbilical Ligament After birth, when circulation in the placenta stops, only the pelvic portion of the umbilical artery remains patent, becoming the internal iliac and the first part of the superior vesicle artery in adulthood. The remainder of this vessel is converted into a solid fibrous cord, called the "medial umbilical ligament," which extends from the pelvis to the umbilicus, or navel, the depression in the abdomen that marks the point where the umbilical cord was attached to the fetus. Bowman's Capsule A kidney contains about one million nephrons, the functional units of the kidney, and each of these consist of a renal corpuscle and a renal tubule. A "renal corpuscle" is composed of tangled clusters of blood capillaries called a "glomerulus," and a thin-walled, saclike structure, called the "Bowman's capsule," which surrounds the glomerulus. The Bowman's capsule is an expansion at the closed end of a renal tubule. It is composed of two layers of cells: an inner layer that closely the closed end of a renal tubule....
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Ask a homework question - tutors are online