Types of Connective Tissue All classes of connective tissue consist of living cells surrounded by a

Types of Connective Tissue All classes of connective tissue consist of living cells surrounded by a

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Types of Connective Tissue All classes of connective tissue consist of living cells surrounded by a matrix. Major differences reflect cell type, fiber type, and proportion of the matrix contributed by the fibers. These three factors determine not only major connective tissue classes Connective Tissue Proper: Two subclasses: 1. loose connective tissue (areolar, adipose, reticular) 2. dense connective tissue (dense regular, dense irregular, elastic) Except for bone, cartilage, and blood, all mature connective tissues belong to this class. Areolar: Semifluid ground substance. All three fiber types are loosely dispersed. Cell types - fibroblasts, macrophages, mast cells, some white blood cells. Serves as a kind of universal packing material between other tissues. Adipose: Very cellular. Very little matrix seen. Richly vascularized. Located under the skin,
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Unformatted text preview: around the kidneys and eyeballs, in bones, within abdomen and breasts. Acts as a shock absorber and as insulation, helps prevent heat loss. Reticular: Limited to certain sites in the body - lymphoid organs, bone marrow, spleen. Forms the soft internal skeleton supporting other cell types. Dense regular connective tissue: Flexible tissue with great resistance to pulling forces. Found where tension is always exerted in a single direction.Forms tendons and ligaments. Dense irregular tissue: Forms sheets in body areas where tension is exerted from many different directions.Found in the skin as the dermis, forms fibrous joint capsules and fibrous coverings that surround some organs (testes, kidneys, bones, nerve). Elastic connective tissue : Found in the walls of the aorta, parts of the tracheas & bronchi, forms vocal cords and ligaments connecting the vertebrae....
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course BSC BSC1085 taught by Professor Sharonsimpson during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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