Acids - • If the anion has an -ate ending, the...

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Acids An acid is a substance whose molecules yield hydrogen ( H+ ) ions when dissolved in water. The formula of an acid consists of an anionic group whose charged is balanced by one or more H+ ions. The name of the acid is related to the name of the anion Anions whose names end in -ide have associated acids that have the hydro- prefix and an -ic suffix: Cl - chloride anion HCl hydro chlor ic acid S 2- sulfide anion H 2 S hydro sulfur ic acid Using the -ic suffix here may seem a bit inconsistent since it was used in naming metal cations to indicate the form which had the higher positive charge. However, when you think about it, the acid compound has a higher net positive charge than the anion from which it is derived (the anion is negatively charge and the associated acid is neutral). Again, things get complicated when we consider the acids of oxyanions:
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Unformatted text preview: • If the anion has an -ate ending, the corresponding acid is given an -ic ending • If the anion has an -ite ending, the corresponding acid has an -ous ending. • Prefixes in the name of the anion are kept in naming the acid ClO-hypo chlor ite ion HClO hypo chlor ous acid ClO 2-chlor ite ion HClO 2 chlor ous acid ClO 3-chlor ate ion HClO 3 chlor ic acid ClO 4-per chlor ate ion HClO 4 per chlor ic acid This is confusing: we previously had used the -ous and -ic suffixes to indicate the ionic charge differences in metal cations (-ic had a higher positive charge). Although in comparison to the ionic form, the -ic and -ous acid forms have a higher net positive charge, the -ic suffix would indicate forms with a higher oxygen content, and not an apparent charge difference....
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM1025 taught by Professor Laurachoudry during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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Acids - • If the anion has an -ate ending, the...

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