Biological databases - Biological databases: why? There are...

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Biological databases: why? There are two main functions of biological databases: 1. Make biological data available to scientists. As much as possible of a particular type of information should be available in one single place (book, site, database). Published data may be difficult to find or access, and collecting it from the literature is very time-consuming. And not all data is actually published explicitly in an article (genome sequences!). 2. To make biological data available in computer-readable form. Since analysis of biological data almost always involves computers, having the data in computer-readable form (rather than printed on paper) is a necessary first step. One of the first biological sequence databases was probably the book "Atlas of Protein Sequences and Structures" by Margaret Dayhoff and colleagues, first published in 1965. It contained the protein sequences determined at the time, and new editions of the book were published well into the 1970s. Its data became the foundation for the PIR database
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Biological databases - Biological databases: why? There are...

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