Databases of multiple alignments

Databases of multiple alignments - Databases of multiple...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Databases of multiple alignments; domains Very early in the days of protein sequence analysis, it was observed that some protein sequences contained long segments that were very similar to other proteins, while the rest of the sequence in that protein had no detectable similarity. Today, we take more or less for granted that proteins are composed of domains , segments of sequence which have been joined together by genetic events during evolution so that the new protein has a function that is based on the activities of the domains it contains. Often the domains detectable by sequence analysis correspond to structural domains in the 3D structure as well. There are now many well-documented cases where it has been shown that domains can exists perfectly well in isolation, when excised from the original protein. Surprisingly often, a domain can be expressed and folded all on its own. There are today several databases that keep track of which domains have been discovered, which proteins are involved, and that store the multiple sequence
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Databases of multiple alignments - Databases of multiple...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online