Examples of Sulfur - added to give an octet of valence...

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Examples of Sulfur H 2 S Sulfur (2.5) is more electronegative than hydrogen (2.1), thus it has an oxidation number of -2. The hydrogen will have an oxidation number of +1. S 8 This is an elemental form of sulfur, and thus would have an oxidation number of 0. SCl 2 Chlorine (3.0) is more electronegative than sulfur (2.5), thus it has an oxidation number of -1. The sulfur thus has an oxidation number of +2. Na 2 SO 3 Sodium (alkali metal) always has an oxidation number of +1. The oxygen (3.5) is more electronegative than sulfur (2.5), thus the oxygen would have an oxidation number of -2. The sulfur would therefore have an oxidation number of +4. SO 4 2- The oxygen is more electronegative and thus has an oxidation number of -2. The sulfur thus has an oxidation number of +6. Sulfur exhibits a variety of oxidation numbers (-2 to +6) In general the most negative oxidation number corresponds to the number of electrons which must be
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Unformatted text preview: added to give an octet of valence electrons • The most positive oxidation number corresponds to a loss of all valence electrons Oxidation Numbers and Nomenclature Compounds of the alkali (oxidation number +1) and alkaline earth metals (oxidation number +2) are typically ionic in nature. Compounds of metals with higher oxidation numbers (e.g. tin +4) tend to form molecular compounds • In ionic and covalent molecular compounds usually the less electronegative element is given first . • • In ionic compounds the names are given which refer to the oxidation (ionic) state • In molecular compounds the names are given which refer to the number of molecules present in the compound Ionic Molecular MgH 2 magnesium hydride H 2 S dihydrogen sulfide FeF 2 iron(II) fluoride OF 2 oxygen difluoride Mn 2 O 3 manganese(III) oxide Cl 2 O 3 dichlorine trioxide...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM1025 taught by Professor Laurachoudry during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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