Heating Curves - the temperature of the liquid water As the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Heating Curves The heating of ice at -25 °C to +125 °C at constant pressure (1 atm) will exhibit the following characteristics Initially, the heat input is used to increase the temperature of the ice, but the ice does not change phase (remains a solid) As the temperature approaches some critical point (i.e. the melting temperature of ice), the kinetic energy of the molecules of water is sufficient to allow the molecules to begin sliding past one another. As the ice begins to melt, additional input of heat energy does not raise the temperature of the water, rather it is used to overcome the intermolecular attraction during the phase change from solid to liquid Once the water is in a liquid phase, increasing the amount of heat input raises
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: the temperature of the liquid water As the temperature approaches another critical point (the vaporization, or boiling, temperature of water) the kinetic energy of the molecules is sufficient to allow the separation of molecules into the gas phase As the liquid begins to boil. Additional input of heat energy does not raise the temperature of the water, rather it is used to overcome the intermolecular attractions during the phase change from liquid to gas Once the water is in the gas phase, additional heat input raises the temperature of the water vapor Note: greater energy is needed to vaporize water than to melt it...
View Full Document

Page1 / 2

Heating Curves - the temperature of the liquid water As the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online