Hydrogen Bonding - Hydrogen Bonding A hydrogen atom in a...

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Hydrogen Bonding A hydrogen atom in a polar bond (e.g. H-F, H-O or H-N) can experience an attractive force with a neighboring electronegative molecule or ion which has an unshared pair of electrons (usually an F, O or N atom on another molecule) Hydrogen bonds are considered to be dipole-dipole type interactions A bond between hydrogen and an electronegative atom such as F, O or N is quite polar: The hydrogen atom has no inner core of electrons, so the side of the atom facing away from the bond represents a virtually naked nucleus This positive charge is attracted to the negative charge of an electronegative atom in a nearby molecule Because the hydrogen atom in a polar bond is electron-deficient on one side (i.e. the side opposite from the covalent polar bond) this side of the hydrogen atom can get quite close to a neighboring electronegative atom (with a partial negative charge) and interact strongly with it (remember, the closer it can get, the stronger the electrostatic attraction)
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Hydrogen Bonding - Hydrogen Bonding A hydrogen atom in a...

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