Lewis Symbols and the Octet Rule

Lewis Symbols and the Octet Rule - number of the element in...

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Lewis Symbols and the Octet Rule Valence electrons reside in the outer shell and are the electrons which are going to be involved in chemical interactions and bonding ( valence comes from the Latin valere , "to be strong"). Electron-dot symbols ( Lewis symbols): convenient representation of valence electrons allows you to keep track of valence electrons during bond formation consists of the chemical symbol for the element plus a dot for each valence electron Sulfur Electron configuration is [Ne]3s 2 3p 4 , thus there are six valence electrons. Its Lewis symbol would therefore be: Note: The dots (representing electrons) are placed on the four sides of the atomic symbol (top, bottom, left, right) Each side can accommodate up to 2 electrons The number of valence electrons in the table below is the same as the column
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Unformatted text preview: number of the element in the periodic table (for representative elements only) Atoms often gain, lose, or share electrons to achieve the same number of electrons as the noble gas closest to them in the periodic table Because all noble gasses (except He) have filled s and p valence orbitals (8 electrons), many atoms undergoing reactions also end up with 8 valence electrons. This observation has led to the Octet Rule : Atoms tend to lose, gain, or share electrons until they are surrounded by 8 valence electrons Note: there are many exceptions to the octet rule (He and H, for example), but it provides a useful model for understanding the basis of chemical bonding....
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Lewis Symbols and the Octet Rule - number of the element in...

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