Lipids - Lipids are involved mainly with long-term energy...

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Lipids are involved mainly with long-term energy storage. They are generally insoluble in polar substances such as water. Secondary functions of lipids include structural components (as in the case of phospholipids that are the major building block in cell membranes) and "messengers" (hormones) that play roles in communications within and between cells. Lipids are composed of three fatty acids (usually) covalently bonded to a 3-carbon glycerol. The fatty acids are composed of CH 2 units, and are hydrophobic/not water soluble. Some examples of fatty acids are shown in Figure 15. Fatty acids can be saturated (meaning they have as many hydrogens bonded to their carbons as possible) or unsaturated (with one or more double bonds connecting their carbons, hence fewer hydrogens). A fat is solid at room temperature, while an oil is a liquid under the same conditions. The fatty acids in oils are mostly unsaturated, while those in fats are mostly saturated. Figure 15. Saturated (top and middle) and unsaturated (bottom) fatty acids. The term
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Lipids - Lipids are involved mainly with long-term energy...

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