Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations

Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations -...

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Quantitative Information from Balanced Equations The coefficients in a balanced chemical equation can be interpreted both as the relative numbers of molecules involved in the reaction and as the relative number of moles . For example, in the balanced equation: 2H 2 ( g ) + O 2 ( g )-> 2H 2 O( l ) the production of two moles of water would require the consumption of 2 moles of H 2 and one mole of O 2 . Therefore, when considering this particular reaction 2 moles of H 2 1 mole of O 2 and 2 moles of H 2 O would be considered to be stoichiometrically equivalent quantitites . Represented as: 2 mol H 2 1 mol O 2 2 mol H 2 O Where ' ' means " stoichiometrically equivalent to ". These stoichiometric relationships, derived from balanced equations, can be used to determine expected amounts of products given amounts of reactants. For example, how many moles of H 2 O would be produced from 1.57 moles of O 2
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Unformatted text preview: 2 (assuming the hydrogen gas is not a limiting reactant)? The ratio is the stoichiometric relationship between H 2 O and O 2 from the balanced equation for this reaction. For the combustion of butane (C 4 H 10 ) the balanced equation is: Calculate the mass of CO 2 that is produced in burning 1.00 gram of C 4 H 10 . First of all we need to calculate how many moles of butane we have in a 100 gram sample: now, the stoichiometric relationship between C 4 H 10 and CO 2 is: , therefore: The question called for the determination of the mass of CO 2 produced, thus we have to convert moles of CO 2 into grams (by using the molecular weight of CO 2 ): Thus, the overall sequence of steps to solve this problem were: In a similar way we could determine the mass of water produced, or oxygen consumed, etc....
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