The genome1 - The genomes: how? The methods we have...

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The genomes: how? The methods we have available today for determining the sequence of DNA can produce sequence data for at most 1000 bases . This means that it is necessary to split up the total DNA of an organism, sequence the parts, and reassemble the know sequence segments based on similarity (identity) between the overlapping parts of the DNA sequence segments. The two main variants of this 'divide-and-conquer' approach are: Clone-based sequencing First generate stable clones of rather large segments of DNA from the organism under study. The size of the segments depend on the technique used. The most commonly used are cosmids (max 45 kb), BACs (max 300 kb) and YACs (max 400 kb). The clones are selected so that they cover the genome (on a per-chromosome basis) in as complete but non-redundant fashion as possible, thus defining a so- called tiling path. This is done by so-called physical mapping. For each selected clone, sequence it by fragmenting the DNA in them randomly, sequencing about 500-700 bases, and reassembling the complete clone sequence from the data. The complete genome is then reassembled from the known tiling path and the
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM1025 taught by Professor Laurachoudry during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The genome1 - The genomes: how? The methods we have...

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