The normal human chromosome complement

The normal human chromosome complement - The normal human...

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The normal human chromosome complement We already had a look at chromosomes in lecture 1 and the following terms should be familiar: 46 XX and 46 XY Human cells are diploid, that is they contain two of (almost) every gene. They do so by having two copies of each autosome, (chromosomes 1-22) and two sex chromosomes (either XX or XY). The normal human karyotype when viewed down the microscope at mitotic metaphase is thus either 46 XX or 46 XY. (Meaning 46 coloured blobs, two of which are XX or XY). This picture shows a normal male mitotic metaphase spread next to an interphase nucleus. The primary constriction is the centromere, visible in the above picture as the point where the two chromatids remain attached, but also containing the kinetochore , the point of spindle attachment.Secondary constrictions are usually only found as the stalks connecting the short arms of the two groups of acrocentric chromosomes. banding
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM1025 taught by Professor Laurachoudry during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The normal human chromosome complement - The normal human...

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