The Photoelectric Effect

The Photoelectric Effect - The Photoelectric Effect Light...

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The Photoelectric Effect Light shining on a metallic surface can cause the surface to emit electrons For each metal there is a minimum frequency of light below which no electrons are emitted , regardless of the intensity of the light The higher the light's frequency above this minimum value, the greater the kinetic energy of the released electron(s) Using Planck's results Einstein (1905) was able to deduce the basis of the photoelectric effect Einstein assumed that the light was a stream of tiny energy packets called Photons Each photon has an energy proportional to its frequency ( E=h ν ) When a photon strikes the metal its energy is transferred to an electron A certain amount of energy is needed to overcome the attractive force between the electron and the protons in the atom Thus, if the quanta of light energy absorbed by the electron is insufficient for the electron to overcome the attractive forces in the atom, the electron will not be ejected - regardless of the intensity of the light. If the quanta of light energy absorbed is greater than the energy needed for the
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course CHEMISTRY CHM1025 taught by Professor Laurachoudry during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The Photoelectric Effect - The Photoelectric Effect Light...

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