Pronouns1

Pronouns1 - demonstrative pronoun 5 Interrogative pronouns...

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A pronoun is a word used in place of a noun or another pronoun.
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1.Marge went for a walk. 2.She went for a walk. In the second sentence, she is a pronoun that takes the place of the noun Marge .
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1 Personal pronouns refer to specific persons or things. Karen ate pizza. She was hungry. The word " she " is a personal pronoun that refers to "Karen."
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2 Reflexive pronouns are personal pronouns that have "-self" or "- selves" added to the end. Bob finished the homework himself. The reflexive pronoun is " himself ."
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3 Indefinite pronouns are pronouns that do not refer to a specific person or thing. Someone , anybody , and, everyone are indefinite pronouns. Someone stole my wallet! The word " someone " is the indefinite pronoun .
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4 A demonstrative pronoun is used to single out one or more nouns referred to in the sentence. This , that , these , and those are demonstrative pronouns. These lemons are sour. The word " these " is a
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Unformatted text preview: demonstrative pronoun . 5 Interrogative pronouns are used to ask a question. Who , whom , and which are interrogative pronouns. Which shoes are mine? The word " which " is an interrogative pronoun . 6 Possessive pronouns are used to show ownership, but they never have an apostrophe. Ours , his , their , and her are possessive pronouns. Those are his pencils. The word " his " is a possessive pronoun . 1 Kris went to the game. ____ brought her little brother with her. Kris went to the game. She brought her little brother with her. 2 Randy left ____ baseball glove at home. Randy left his baseball glove at home. 3 _____ left a book on the playground. Someone left a book on the playground. 4 _____ pair of shoes belongs to James? Which pair of shoes belongs to James? 5 That beach blanket is ____ . That beach blanket is ours ....
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Pronouns1 - demonstrative pronoun 5 Interrogative pronouns...

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