Ancient Greece Final

Ancient Greece Final - GreekVasePainting...

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    Greek Vase Painting Ancient Greek Culture and Art (Click On One of the Blue Boxes to Begin)
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      Ancient Greek Art Most of the ancient Greek art that is still around today is in the forms of pottery, sculpture and architecture. Most ancient Greek paintings have deteriorated or been destroyed, except for most paintings on pottery. Why are they gone? Greek painters worked mainly on wooden panels, which deteriorated over time. One of the sad facts of ancient history is that when marble is burned, lime is produced, and that was also the fate of the great bulk of Greek marble statuary during the Middle Ages. Likewise, the shortage of metal during the Middle Ages led to the majority of Greek bronze statues being melted down. Those statues which had survived did so primarily because they had been buried and forgotten, or as in the case of bronzes having been lost at sea. The great majority of Greek buildings have not survived to this day: either they had been pillaged in war, had been looted for building materials or had been destroyed in Greece’s many earthquakes. Only a handful of temples, such as the Parthenon and the Temple of Hephaestus in Athens, have been spared.
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Ancient Greek Pottery Greek pots are important because they tell us so much about how life was in ancient Greece. Ancient Greek pots were often beautifully decorated with scenes from daily life. Sometimes these scenes reflected what the pot was used for. Procession of men, kylix by the Triptolemos Painter , circa 480 BC. Paris : Louvre Performing a libation , interior of a bowl by Makron , circa 480 BC. Paris : Louvre
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Psykteres were wine coolers. Oinochoai were wine jugs. Chytra Used as cooking pots. Stamnoi were used for holding wine before mixing it with water Lekythoi were oil bottles. Hydria Used to carry water. Alabastron Small vases used by women for storing perfume or oil. Amphora Used for carrying and storing solids and liquids. Chous Used as jugs. Kantharos Used as drinking cups with two vertical handles Krater comes from a word meaning 'mix'. Kraters were used for mixing wine with water. Kylikes
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course EL ED 311 taught by Professor Sisterholmes during the Winter '11 term at BYU.

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Ancient Greece Final - GreekVasePainting...

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