VUS 9 - Imperialism and WWI Standard VUS. 9 The student...

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Unformatted text preview: Imperialism and WWI Standard VUS. 9 The student will demonstrate knowledge of the emerging role of the United States in world affairs and key domestic events after 1890 by (a) Explaining the changing policies of the United States toward Latin America and Asia and the growing influence of the United States in foreign markets; (b) Evaluating United States involvement in World War I, including Wilsons Fourteen Points, the Treaty of Versailles, and the national debate over treaty ratification and the League of Nations. United States Foreign Policy Many twentieth century American foreign policy issues have their origins in Americas emergence as a world power at the end of the nineteenth century. Americas eventual intervention (involvement) in World War I ensured its role as a world power for the remainder of the twentieth century. The growing role of the United States in international trade displayed the American urge to build, innovate, and explore new markets. In short, American businessmen believed they could make huge profits and bring the nation economic prosperity through international trade. Isolationism Washingtons Farewell Address (1796) set precedent for the United States to pursue a policy of isolationism. Isolationism was the policy of avoiding involvement in world affairs. Although in the Monroe Doctrine (1824) the United States had declared itself the protector of the entire western hemisphere, isolationism continued to form the basis of American foreign policy throughout most of the nineteenth century. George Washington at the end of his presidency. Disturbed by the war between England and France and the attempts of both nations to draw the U.S. into it as an ally, Washington issued a "Farewell Address" in which he warned against permanent alliances with foreign nations. Imperialism However, as the United States industrialized during the second half of the 1800s, businessmen and politicians increasingly looked longingly towards foreign markets as a potential source of American corporate profits. The desire to gain this untapped wealth led the United States to expand its influence in the world during the late nineteenth century. Some historians have called this period the age of American imperialism, because during this period the United States gained control over Hawaii, the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands. Imperialism is the act of one nation gaining political or economic control over other countries. United States Foreign Policy American businessmen with the help of American politicians tried to gain access (entrance) to foreign markets in several ways. During the presidency of William McKinley, Secretary of State John Hay proposed the Open Door Policy . This policy wanted to give all nations equal trading rights in China. Its goal was to open to American businessmen the Chinese market from which they had previously been excluded. It also urged all foreigners in China to obey Chinese law and observe practices of fair competition. United States Foreign Policy...
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VUS 9 - Imperialism and WWI Standard VUS. 9 The student...

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