TransconRR

TransconRR - The Transcontinental Railroad ,but...

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The Transcontinental Railroad Railroads had already transformed life in the East, but  at the end of the Civil War railroad tracks still stopped  at the Missouri River. For a quarter of a century, men  had dreamed of building a line from coast to coast.  Now they would attempt to lay 1,775 miles of track from  Omaha to Sacramento.  Slide #1
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The Transcontinental Railroad Slide #2 It was 1,775  miles from  Omaha, NE to  Sacramento, CA.
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The Transcontinental Railroad A path would have to be cut through mountains  higher than any railroad-builder had ever faced; span  deserts where there was no water anywhere; and  cross treeless prairies where anxious and defiant  Indians would resist their passage.  Slide #3
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The Transcontinental Railroad In  1862 , Congress gave charters to two companies to  build these tracks. The Central Pacific was to push  eastward from Sacramento, over the Sierra Nevada  mountains. The Union Pacific was to start from Omaha  Nebraska, cross the great plains and cut through the  Rockies. Slide #4
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The Transcontinental Railroad The Union Pacific and Central Pacific were soon  locked in a race to see who could lay the most track --  and therefore get the most land and money.  Somewhere in the West -- no one knew exactly where  -- the two lines were supposed to meet.  Slide #5
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The Transcontinental Railroad Theodore Judah discovered a route for the railroad  through the Sierra mountains. He and Doc Strong  formed the Central Pacific Railroad.  They located four 
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course EL ED 365 taught by Professor Brothermercier during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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TransconRR - The Transcontinental Railroad ,but...

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