03BlazingANewFrontier

03BlazingANewFrontier - BLAZING A NEW FRONTIER Thomas...

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Unformatted text preview: BLAZING A NEW FRONTIER Thomas Jefferson's Grand Idea . . . Lewis and Clark's Great Adventure ". . . the object of your mission is to explore the Missouri river, and such principal streams of it, as, by its course and communication with the waters of the Pacific Ocean, w Oregon, Colorado or any other river, may offer the most direct and practicable water communication across this continent for the purposes of commerce . . ." By the time Jefferson was ready to request funds for the expedition, his relationship with the opposition in Congress was anything but friendly. Secretary of the Treasury Albert Gallatin urged that the request be made in secret. The message focused on the state of Indian trade and mentioned the proposed western expedition near the end of the document. ROSTER OF THE MEN ROSTER OF THE MEN Manifest of Supplies Presents for Indians: 12 dozen pocket mirrors 4,600 sewing needles 144 small scissors 10 pounds of sewing thread silk ribbons ivory combs handkerchiefs yards of bright-colored cloth 130 rolls of tobacco tomahawks that doubled as pipes 288 knives 8 brass kettles vermilion face paint 33 pounds of tiny beads Drawing & Notes for Keel Boat KEEL BOAT KEEL BOAT Keel Boat Keel Boat St. Louis: The Town as Seen by Lewis and Clark William Clark April 7, 1805 April 7, 1805 We were now about to penetrate a country at least two thousand miles in width, on which the foot of civilized man had never trodden, Lewis wrote Pipe tomahawk Pipe tomahawks are artifacts unique to North America--created by Europeans as trade objects but often exchanged as diplomatic gifts. They are powerful symbols of the choice Europeans and Indians faced whenever they met: one end was the pipe of peace, the other an axe of war. Lewis's expedition packing list notes that fifty pipe tomahawks were to be taken on the expedition. JEFFERSON PEACE MEDAL Lewis was frustrated by the egalitarian nature of Indian society: "the authority of the Chief being nothing more than mere admonition . . . in fact every man is a chief." He set out to change that by "making chiefs." He passed out medals, certificates, and uniforms to give power to chosen men. In their speeches, Lewis and Clark called the Indians "children." To explorers, the term expressed the relationship of ruler and subject. In their speeches, the Indians called Lewis and Clark " father ,... To them, it expressed kinship and their assumption that an adoptive father undertook an obligation to show generosity and loyalty to his new family. In all the captains would describe in their journals 178 plants and 122 animals that previously had not been recorded for science. "We shall delineate with correctness the great arteries of this great country: those who come after us will . . . fill up the canvas we begin." --Thomas Jefferson, 1805 AUGUST 12, 1805...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course EL ED 365 taught by Professor Brothermercier during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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03BlazingANewFrontier - BLAZING A NEW FRONTIER Thomas...

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