The French and Indian War-ALL

The French and Indian War-ALL - The French and Indian War...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
The French and Indian War “England and France compete in North America”
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
French and English Collide The “French and Indian War”, the colonial part of the “Seven Years War” that ravaged Europe from 1756 to 1763, was the bloodiest American war in the 1700’s. It took more lives than the American Revolution, involved people on three continents, including the Caribbean.
Background image of page 2
The war was the product of a clash between the French and English over colonial territory and wealth. In North America, the war can also be seen as a product of the local rivalry between British and French colonists.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Tensions between the British and French in America had been getting worse for some time, as each side wanted to gain more land. In the 1740s, both England and France traded for furs with the Native Americans in the Ohio Country. By the 1750s, English colonists, especially the investors in the Ohio Company, also hoped to convert the wilderness into good farmland. Each side tried to keep the other out of the Ohio Country. In the early 1750s, French soldiers captured several English trading posts and built Fort Duquense (now called Pittsburgh) to defend their territory from English incursions.
Background image of page 4
What is now considered the “French and Indian War” (though at the time the war was undeclared), began in 1753, when a young Virginian, Major George Washington, and a number of men headed out into the Ohio region to deliver a message to a French Captain demanding that French troops leave the territory. The demand was rejected by the French.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In 1754, George Washington and a small force of Virginia militiamen marched to the Ohio Country to drive the French out. Washington hoped to capture Fort Duquesne but soon realized the fort was too strong, so he retreated and when chased by the Freench, quickly built Fort Necessity. If he could not drive the French from the area, they would at least have to reckon with the English fortifications. He also hoped to convince native people that England was the stronger force, so that they would ally with the British rather than the French.
Background image of page 6
A combined force of French soldiers and their native allies overwhelmed Fort Necessity on July 3, 1754, marking the start of the “French and Indian War” in North America. The French permitted Washington and his men to return to Virginia safely, but made them promise they would not build another fort west of the Appalachian Mountains for at least a year. England did not officially declare war until 1756, although the conflict had actually begun two years earlier at Fort Necessity.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
After a year and a half of undeclared war, the French and the English formally declared war in May 1756. For the first three years of the war, the outnumbered French dominated the battlefield, soundly defeating the English in battles at Fort Oswego and Ticonderoga. Perhaps the
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

The French and Indian War-ALL - The French and Indian War...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online