9E85DF571ACF4C628A972BBDC9244A93 (2)

9E85DF571ACF4C628A972BBDC9244A93 (2) -...

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    The Sauk, Fox, and the Black  Hawk War of 1832 Compiled by: Scott Church Guilford High School Rockford, Illinois 14 July 2006
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Sauk Images
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Sauk Beginnings • Originally located in Eastern Ontario • Conflicts with the Iroquois Nations – Iroquois trade routes  – Tribal conflicts
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La Nouvelle France
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La Nouvelle France • Establishment of Fur Trade • Very lucrative for trading nations • Conflict produced among tribes • Beaver as best skin for trade • Later trade established with Sauk and  Fox in Wisconsin
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Tribes of New France
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The Six Tribes of the Iroquois  Confederacy
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Iroquois Land and Warrior
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Sauk Migration • Driven out of eastern Ontario • Settle in Lower Michigan
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O-Sag-A-Nong • Saginaw County was  named after the Sauk  Indians who  originally inhabited  the area in the  1800’s, before being  evicted by the  Iroquois and later  the Chippewa. "O- Sag-A-Nong" means  "land of the Sauks." 
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Migration (cont’d) • The Sauk were then driven out of  Central Michigan into NE Wisconsin  (Present-Day Green Bay) • Fox join them here as they seek refuge  from the French • From WI to Saukenuk (near the Quad  Cities, IL and IA)
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Saukenuk
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Saukenuk • Political, cultural, religious, and social  capital of the Sauk people • Allied with French, changed after Seven  Years’ War to British • Black Hawk is born here in 1767 • Most western battle of the American  Revolution is fought here in 1780  (Support of British because of trade) • Most Illinois tribes support Americans
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Black Hawk
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Effects of American  Revolution • Americans now “controlled” territory • British use Sauk to oppose American  territory • Sauk want continued trade system  enjoyed with both the French and  English • Few white Americans are moving into  territory
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The New Northwest
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Louisiana Purchase (1803)
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1804 Changes • Murder of white settler by Sauk prompts  a summons to St. Louis • Delegation brought the murderer and  surrendered him • Pardon issued from Washington, but not  arrived before an attempted escape and  shooting
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1804 Changes (Cont’d) • Jefferson hoped to peacefully assimilate all  Indians into American society, or if they  wanted their traditional life, then they should  go west of the Mississippi River • Treaty to formally surrender all Sauk lands  east of the Mississippi (Delegation not able to  agree to this, and likely did not understand  American intentions) • William Clark and William Henry Harrison  conduct treaty hearings.
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Clark and Harrison
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Road to Discontent • Tecumseh urges resistance to Americans • Ft. Madison built 1808 • Besieged in 1811 for 1 day • War of 1812 breaks out – Americans urge neutrality – British stir up discontent – Americans do not honour credit system in  trade
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9E85DF571ACF4C628A972BBDC9244A93 (2) -...

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