chapter18 (2)

chapter18 (2) - Chapter18AmericansMoveWest Section Notes

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Chapter 18 – Americans Move West Section Notes Miners, Ranchers, and Railroads Wars for the West Farming and Populism Video The Impact of the West on American C Images Completion  of the  Transcontinental  Railroad The Plains Indians Pioneer Family Deadwood, South Dakota Quick Facts Causes and Effects of  Westward  Expansion Effects of the Transcontinental  Railroad Chapter 18 Visual Summary Maps Routes West Native American Land Loss                     in  the West, 1850-1890 Skills Page Maps: Migration
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Miners, Ranchers, and Railroads The Big Idea As more settlers moved West, mining, ranching, and railroads soon  transformed the western landscape. Main Ideas A mining boom brought growth to the West.  The demand for cattle created a short-lived Cattle Kingdom on the  Great Plains. East and West were connected by the transcontinental railroad.
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Main Idea 1:  A mining boom brought  growth to the West. Americans continued to move west during the 1800s. The American  frontier  reached the Pacific Ocean when California  was added to the Union in 1850. Settlers built homes, ranches, and farms. Railroads expanded west to bring western goods to eastern  markets. Mining companies shipped gold and silver east from western  mines.
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Mining in the West Mining became big business with discoveries of large deposits of  precious metals, such as the  Comstock Lode  in Nevada. Miners from all over the world came to work in the western mines. Boomtowns  grew quickly when a mine opened and often disappeared  quickly when the mine closed. Mining was dangerous. The equipment was unsafe and miners had to  breathe hot, stuffy air that causes lung disease.  Poorly planned  explosions and cave-ins killed and injured miners. Fires were also a  threat.
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Main Idea 2:  The demand for cattle created a short-lived Cattle  Kingdom on the Great Plains. The increasing demand for beef helped the cattle industry grow. Cattle ranchers in Texas drove herds to Abilene, Kansas, to be shipped  east. Cattle ranching spread across the Great Plains, creating the  Cattle  Kingdom  that stretched from Texas to Canada. Ranchers grazed huge herds on public land called the open range. Competition, the invention of barbed wire, and the loss of prairie grass  brought an end to the Cattle Kingdom.
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Cowboys were workers who took care of ranchers’ cattle. They borrowed many techniques from vaqueros, who were 
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course EL ED 365 taught by Professor Brothermercier during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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chapter18 (2) - Chapter18AmericansMoveWest Section Notes

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