Abenaki Indians

Abenaki Indians - native language. Here is an Abenaki elder...

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Abenaki Indians “People of the Dawn”
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Where they lived The Abenakis used to live in Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine. After European colonists came here, many Abenakis fled to Canada or moved in with neighboring tribes. Today, Abenaki Indians live on two reservations in Quebec (Canada) and scattered around New England. Abenakis in the United States do not have a reservation.
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Eastern Woodland Indians The Abenaki were one of the tribes of Eastern Woodland Indians.
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Homes The Abenakis lived in small round buildings called wigwams. Some Abenaki families preferred to build Iroquois-style longhouses instead. Today, Native Americans only build a wigwam for fun or to connect with their heritage. Most Abenakis live in modern houses and apartment buildings, just like you.
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Watch a movie clip about making a wigwam:
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Language Abenakis in the U.S. today speak English, but some Canadian elders still speak their
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Unformatted text preview: native language. Here is an Abenaki elder speaking their native language: Clothing Transportation The Abenaki tribe was known for their birchbark canoes. Heres a movie clip about peeling bark off birch trees: Bibliography The following websites were used to make this presentation: http://www.geocities.com/bigorrin/abenaki_kids.htm http://www.nativetech.org/clothing/regions/region3.html http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~abenaki/Wobanaki/conver01.htm http://www.angelfire.com/ky2/winterschild/wall9.jpg http://nativeamericanrhymes.com/library/homes/longhouse.htm Native Americans: People of the Forest. Rainbow Educational Media (2004). Retrieved September 30, 2006, from unitedstreaming: http://www.unitedstreaming.com Powerpoint presentation by: Sally Horowitz Northside Elementary Midway, KY...
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This note was uploaded on 11/22/2011 for the course EL ED 365 taught by Professor Brothermercier during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Abenaki Indians - native language. Here is an Abenaki elder...

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