Plant production- watering

Plant production- - a human hair Millions of these tiny droplets hit the surrounding air"flash evaporate" and quickly reduce temperatures

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Plant production  Watering plants
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Why do plants need water? Water keeps plants upright and stops them  wilting. Plants also need water to make food and to carry  nutrients through them. Some plants need lots of water and others need  very little.
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Watering methods Most plants can be watered from a watering can,  from above.
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Some need to be watered from below, by standing  the pot in a water filled tray for a few minutes.
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Capillary matting This is a material that absorbs water and stays  moist.
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Pupils made this automatic watering system. Water drips very slowly  out of the tube onto capillary matting, lining the tray. The plants  absorb the water.
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Misting Systems Misting systems produce water spraying droplets that are smaller than 
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Unformatted text preview: a human hair. Millions of these tiny droplets hit the surrounding air, "flash evaporate", and quickly reduce temperatures 25 to 35 degrees. Underwatering plants • Underwatered plants wilt, have dry, yellow leaves and dry compost. Overwatering plants • If compost or soil is waterlogged, roots are starved of air. • Overwatered plants have soft, rotting or mouldy leaves and slimy compost. This powerpoint was kindly donated to www.worldofteaching.com http://www.worldofteaching.com is home to over a thousand powerpoints submitted by teachers. This is a completely free site and requires no registration. Please visit and I hope it will help in your teaching....
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course BIO 100 taught by Professor Robinson during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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Plant production- - a human hair Millions of these tiny droplets hit the surrounding air"flash evaporate" and quickly reduce temperatures

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