Recombinant DNA and Polymerase chain reaction

Recombinant DNA and Polymerase chain reaction - DNA Double...

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Unformatted text preview: DNA Double Helix Structure Each spiral strand is composed of a sugar phosphate backbone and attached bases 4 Bases: Adenine (A), Guanine(G), Cytosine (C), and Thymine (T). Form Base Pairs; A with T and C with G in the complementary strand via hydrogen bonding (non- covalent) The strands can be cut by restriction enzymes, e.g. ECOR1 Bacteria are often used in biotechnology as they have plasmids A plasmid a circular piece of DNA that exists apart from the chromosome and replicates independently of it. DNA that has been cut from one strand of DNA and then inserted into the gap of another piece of DNA that has been broken. The host DNA is often a bacterial cell such as E coli . The purpose of splicing the gene into the host DNA is to produce many copies of it. As bacteria reproduce in a very short time it is possible to make millions of copies of the gene fairly quickly. The required gene e.g. Insulin, is cut from the DNA using a restriction enzyme. A circular piece of DNA, called a plasmid, is removed from the bacterial cell and is cut open using the same...
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Recombinant DNA and Polymerase chain reaction - DNA Double...

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