Heterotrophic Nutrition

Heterotrophic Nutrition - Heterotrophic Nutrition By Abdul...

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1 Heterotrophic Nutrition By Abdul Manap Mahmud
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2 Introduction Definitions of heterotrophic on the Web: Refers to organisms, such as animals, that depend on preformed organic molecules from the environment (or another organism) as a source of nutrients/energy. www.emc.maricopa.edu/faculty/farabee/BIOBK/BioBookglossH.html Requiring organic substrates for growth and development; being incapable of synthesizing required organic materials from inorganic sources. (20) ppathw3.cals.cornell.edu/glossary/Defs_H.htm obtaining nourishment from organic substances, not from food produced within the organism. www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/canwaters-eauxcan/bbb-lgb/library-bibliotheque/gloss
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3 unable to derive energy from photosynthesis or from inorganic chemical reactions, and so dependent on energy-containing organic compounds derived from the current or prior existence of other organisms, cf. AUTOTROPHIC. www.mycolog.com/GLOSSARY.htm Describing consumers, organisms that cannot synthesize food from inorganic materials and therefore must use the bodies of other organisms as a source of energy and body-building materials.* biology.usgs.gov/s+t/noframe/z999.htm An organism incapable of producing organic compound from inorganic materials and thus must rely on other living or dead organisms for its food supply. www.botanyvt.com/pages/dictionary.shtml requiring ready formed organic food. gmbis.marinebiodiversity.ca/BayOfFundy/glossE-H.html Introduction
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4 Source of Carbon
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5 Source of Carbon
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6 The concentration of carbon in living matter (18%) is almost 100 times greater than its concentration in the earth (0.19%). So living things extract carbon from their nonliving environment. For life to continue, this carbon must be recycled. Source of Carbon
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7 Carbon exists in the nonliving environment as: Carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere and dissolved in water (forming HCO3−) Carbonate rocks (limestone and coral = CaCO3) Deposits of coal, petroleum, and natural gas derived from once-living things Dead organic matter, e.g., humus in the soil Source of Carbon
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8 Carbon enters the biotic world through the action of autotrophs: primarily photoautotrophs , like plants and algae, that use the energy of light to convert carbon dioxide to organic matter. and to a small extent, chemoautotrophs — bacteria and archaeans that do the same but use the energy derived from an oxidation of molecules in their substrate. Source of Carbon
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9 Carbon returns to the atmosphere and water by Respiration (as CO2) Burning Decay (producing CO2 if oxygen is present, methane (CH4) if it is not. Source of Carbon
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Source of Carbon
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Source of Carbon
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Chemoheterotroph on the Web: A chemoheterotroph is an organism that must consume organic molecules for both energy and carbon. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemoheterotroph
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course BIO 100 taught by Professor Robinson during the Fall '08 term at BYU.

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Heterotrophic Nutrition - Heterotrophic Nutrition By Abdul...

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