Industrial Revolution

Industrial Revolution - Industrial Revolution By J. Collins...

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Industrial Revolution By J. Collins
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Industrial Revolution The IR is when people stopped making stuff at home and started making stuff in factories.
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Cottage Industry
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Factory system
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Cotton gin His cotton gin removed the seeds out of raw cotton.
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Steam Engine The steam engine was not just a transportation device. It ran entire factories the way rivers used to.
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Steam engine
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Railroads
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Transcontinental RR The transcontinental railroad made travel across the country faster, cheaper and more efficient.
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The transcontinental RR met in Utah
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Canals Canals are manmade waterways dug between 2 large bodies of water. The Erie Canal was a short cut from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes.
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Erie Canal 1825
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Panama Canal The Panama Canal was a shortcut from the Atlantic to the Pacific (or backwards).
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Panama Canal
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Telegraph Samuel Morse invented the telegraph. It communicated using a series of beeps (Morse code).
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telephone Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone.
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Robber Barons Andrew Carnegie owned US Steel.
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Steel Mill at night.
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Robber Barons John D. Rockefeller owned the railroads and the oil industries
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Monopoly Carnegie and Rockefeller ran their competition out of business. A monopoly is when one company controls the entire industry.
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Thomas Edison The light bulb allowed factories to work at night.
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Phonograph
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This note was uploaded on 11/23/2011 for the course HIST 202 taught by Professor Nokes during the Fall '11 term at BYU.

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Industrial Revolution - Industrial Revolution By J. Collins...

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