32 Absolutism

32 Absolutism - Absolutism And Religious Wars (Nice Legs!)...

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Absolutism And Religious Wars (Nice Legs!)
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Hapsburg Austria Most powerful ruling family in European  history for the most time AEIOU " Alles Erdreich Ist Österreich Untertan " "All the world is subject to Austria”
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Hapsburg Empire Traditional rulers of Austria Expanded through marriage to gain the following countries: Burgundy Netherlands Spain, Portugal and colonies Bohemia Hungary = Hapsburg Empire
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Marriage: Was it their lip/jaw? Charles V (1500-1558) Leopold I (1640-1705) Philip IV (1605-1665) Charles II (1661-1700)
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Hapsburg: Decline The height of the empire was under Charles V Decline of power because of the Reformation Spent tremendous resources fighting the Ottomans who were invading from the East Although a strong Catholic, his army sacked Rome because the army was not being paid Charles V divided the empire into two parts: 1. Spain and its colonies (including Netherlands) 2. Austria, the Holy Roman Empire, and surrounding countries
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Hapsburg Spain Phillip II (son of Charles V) Fought decline for a generation Inflation, privateers and Armada Revolts Low countries Catalonia Naples Portugal Thirty Years War Weakened Spain (money and men)
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Thirty Years War “Most important event in the history of Germany” ― Rudi Seehagen (German scholar) “The creation of the European system of sovereign states” ― Vejas Liulevicius (Univ. of Tennessee) The treaty ending the Thirty Years War was condemned by the papacy as “null, void, invalid, iniquitous, unjust, damnable, reprobate, inane, and devoid of meaning for all time” ― Pope Innocent X
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Thirty Years War Defenestration of Prague Phases of the war and (the reason for fighting) Bohemia (Religious) Hapsburgs (Catholics) Germans (Protestants) Denmark (Religious) Sweden (Political and religious) France (Political) Population losses in Germany  as a result of the Thirty Years War
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Peace of Westphalia First international peace conference Over 200 monarchs in attendance Established precedents in diplomacy No clear winner of the war Ended because of exhaustion Established the concept of a strong king who ruled over a sovereign state Weakened the Holy Roman Empire and Spain Strengthened France and small German states Reduced importance of religion Encouraged Protestants and Catholics to ally
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Discussion Why did the Thirty Years War last so long and become so intense?
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Second Semester Societal changes 1500 to 1648 –  Dominated by the issue of  what to believe in religion   (Redefinition of  the First Estate) 1649 to 1789 –  Dominated by the issue of  the mode of government  (Redefinition of  the Second Estate) 1790 to present –  Dominated by the issue  of social and economic equality  (Redefinition of the Third Estate) 
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Hapsburgs versus Bourbons French kings (Bourbons) felt threatened by the Hapsburgs
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This note was uploaded on 11/25/2011 for the course MFG 202 taught by Professor Davis,d during the Summer '08 term at BYU.

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32 Absolutism - Absolutism And Religious Wars (Nice Legs!)...

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