Force - Force If we exert the same force on several objects...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Force If we exert the same force on several objects with different mass, we will observe different accelerations. For example, one can throw a baseball significantly further (and faster) than a ball of similar size made of lead. The unit of force is the Newton (N), and a force of 1 N is defined as the force that when applied to an object with a mass of 1 kg, produces an acceleration of 1 m/s 2 . If we apply a force equal to 2 N, the corresponding acceleration is 2 m/s 2 . Experiments have shown that the force is a vector. This can be shown by demonstrating that the force has a magnitude and a direction. Suppose, we apply a force of 3 N to our standard object (mass 1 kg). The force is applied such that the resulting acceleration of 3 m/s 2 is upwards (positive y-direction). In addition, we apply a force of 4 N in the horizontal direction (this force is applied such that the standard object will accelerate with an acceleration of 4 m/s 2 in the direction of the positive x-axis if this is the only force applied). The situation is illustrated in Figure 5.1. If both forces are acting on the standard mass simultaneously, the acceleration of the
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This document was uploaded on 11/25/2011.

Page1 / 3

Force - Force If we exert the same force on several objects...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online