Relative Motion in 1D

Relative Motion in 1D - Relative Motion in 1D The...

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Relative Motion in 1D The description of the motion of an object depends on the motion of the observer. A man standing along a highway observes cars moving with a velocity of + 55 miles/hour. If our observer would be traveling in one of these cars with a velocity of + 55 miles/hour he would see the other cars moving with a velocity of 0 miles/hour. This demonstrates that the observed velocity of an object depends on the motion of the observer. We will start our discussion with relative motion in one dimension. Figure 4.5. Relative Motion in One Dimension. Suppose a moving car is observed by an observer located at the origin of frame A, and by an observer located at the origin of frame B (see Figure 4.5). The snapshot shown in Figure 4.5 shows that at that instant, the distance between observer A and observer B equals x BA . The position of the car measured by observer A, x CA , and the position of the car measured by observer B, x CB , are related as follows: x CA = x BA + x CB If we differentiate this equation with respect to time, the following relation is obtained for the
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Relative Motion in 1D - Relative Motion in 1D The...

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