Thermal Expansion

Thermal Expansion - Thermal Expansion When the temperature...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Thermal Expansion When the temperature of a material increases its length increases. This effect is called thermal expansion . The increase in length, [[Delta]]L, is proportional to the change in temperature [[Delta]]T: where [[alpha]] is a constant called the coefficient of linear expansion . The coefficient of linear expansion depends on the material and typical values range between 0.5 x 10 -6 K -1 and 10 x 10 -6 K -1 (at room temperature). For liquids the volume expansion is the only meaningful parameter where [[beta]] is the coefficient of volume expansion for the liquid. The coefficients of volume expansion and linear expansion are related. Suppose the temperature of a volume V (length L, height H and width W) is increased by [[Delta]]T. The volume change [[Delta]]V can be calculated We conclude that Water is the only exception of simple thermal expansion. Its specific volume passes through a minimum (maximum density) at 4 deg.C. Between 0 deg.C and 4 deg.C the water contracts with increasing temperature, and above 4 deg.C it expands with increasing temperature (that is why
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Thermal Expansion - Thermal Expansion When the temperature...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online