03-Absolute_Space_Time

03-Absolute_Space_Time - Absolute Space and Time Biology...

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Absolute Space and Time Biology 190A Lecture 3 --- Prof. Steve Schneider Dept. of Astronomy
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Aristotelian Beliefs Many ideas of the great ancient Greek philosophers grew to become dogmatic beliefs by the 1600s: All matter was made of earth, water, air, and fire in different proportions, and tended to moved up or down to find their natural place. Earth was at the center of the Universe, and celestial matter was made of some perfect ―quintessential‖ substance.
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Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) The Beginning of Modern Science Galileo’s study of bodies in motion challenged accepted beliefs based on Aristotle. For example, he showed that falling bodies accelerate, and those of unequal mass both fall at the same rate.
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Galileo’s Telescopic Discoveries Starry Messenger (1610) Galileo did not discover the telescope, but he improved it and discovered many things with the telescope that contradicted accepted beliefs. Galilean satellites of Jupiter Craters on the Moon
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Isaac Newton (1642-1727) Laws of Motion and the Law of Gravity Developed calculus while on break from university, which closed because of a plague epidemic. Discovered that white light is composed of all colors, and designed the first reflecting telescope
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Objects in Motion speed – rate at which an object moves, i.e. the distance traveled per unit time [m/s; mi/hr] velocity – an object’s speed in a certain direction, e.g. ―10 m/s moving east‖ acceleration – a change in an object’s velocity, i.e. a change in either speed or direction is an acceleration [m/s 2 ]
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Forces force – we commonly call this a push or a pull. A force is anything that
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03-Absolute_Space_Time - Absolute Space and Time Biology...

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