{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

free markets and dead mothers

free markets and dead mothers - CRAIG R JANES Departments...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C RAIG R. J ANES Departments of Anthropology and Health and Behavioral Sciences University of Colorado at Denver O YUNTSETSEG C HULUUNDORJ Department of Health and Behavioral Sciences University of Colorado at Denver Free Markets and Dead Mothers: The Social Ecology of Maternal Mortality in Post-Socialist Mongolia Beginning in 1990, Mongolia, a former client state of what was then the Soviet Union, undertook liberal economic reforms. These came as a great shock to Mongolia and Mongolians, and resulted in food shortages, reports of famine, widespread unemployment, and a collapse of public health and health care. Although economic conditions have stabilized in recent years, unemployment and poverty are still at disturbingly high levels. One important consequence of the transition has been the transfor- mationoftherural,primarilypastoral,economy.Withde-collectivization, herding households have been thrown into a highly insecure subsistence mode of production, and, as a consequence, have become vulnerable to local fluctuations in rainfall and availability and quality of forage, and many now lack access to traded staples and essential commodities. Household food insecurity, malnutrition, and migration of impoverished households to provincial centers and the capital of Ulaanbaatar are one result. Reductions to investments in the health sector have also eroded the quality of services in rural areas, and restricted access to those services still functioning. Evidence suggests that women are particularly vulner- able to these political-ecological changes, and that this vulnerability is manifested in increasing rates of poor reproductive health and mater- nal mortality. Drawing on case-study ethnographic and epidemiological data, this article explores the links between neoliberal economic reform and maternal mortality in Mongolia. [Mongolia, maternal mortality, ne- oliberal reform, post-socialist societies, political ecology of pastoralism] Medical Anthropology Quarterly , Vol. 18, Issue 2, pp. 230–257, ISSN 0745-5194, online ISSN 1548- 1387. C 2004 by the American Anthropological Association. All rights reserved. Send requests for permission to reprint to: Rights and Permissions, University of California Press, Journals Division, 2000 Center Street, Suite 303, Berkeley, CA 94704-1223. 230
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
M ATERNAL M ORTALITY IN P OST -S OCIALIST M ONGOLIA 231 Introduction M aternal mortality, morbidity, and, by extension, perinatal mortality and the health experience of surviving children, are the results of a com- plex interaction of biological, medical, and social factors (AbouZahr et al. 1996; Figa-Talamanca 1996; Stokoe 1991). Although the proximal causes of maternal mortality, pregnancy complications, and the impact on the fetus and neonate have been the subject of substantial biomedical research, the association between individual-level factors and those operating at the level of society and community—political-economic factors, social behaviors, cultural beliefs, and ac- cessibility (perceived and actual) of appropriate health care services—are as yet poorly understood (Miller et al. 2003; Okonofua et al. 1992; Okolocha et al. 1998;
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern